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Last month, I attended our annual global summit for Microsoft senior management to prepare for the upcoming fiscal year. The time is a chance to reflect on results, challenges and of course the leadership we provide to our respective parts of the company.

The host of the meeting is, like Allan Leighton featured last month, another Walmart executive alumnus, COO Kevin Turner who himself invests a lot of time, energy and thought on the subject of Leadership. At his keynote and later in an internal web-cast symposium he did on the topic, he shared a few choice words many of which focused on the role of adversity…

[Referring to the building of the Windows franchise] “They just refused to fail. Windows took ten years to be profitable.”

[Referring to Sam Walton’s description of looking for the downsides to address] “Divine discontent. No matter how well we did it yesterday, we can do it better today.”

[Referring to the Microsoft culture and values] “One of our corporate values is embracing self-criticism without getting de-motivated.”

[Referring to professional development] “Improvement always requires some degree of failure. Tough times don’t make you who you are, tough times show you who you are”

Kevin talked about building on one’s strengths versus fixing weaknesses. It might seem that not focusing fixing weakness would be out of step with ‘embracing failure’, but actually it is the other way around. Fixing a weakness is rejecting that shortcoming and investing sometimes disproportionate resources to overcome it. Embracing failure is accepting it and moving on. Of course, there are limits and contexts to the application of all of these tenets. Glaring or debilitating weaknesses certainly need attention. But, many times one can manage around the weakness typically through partnership. It’s really a variation of the management adage to ‘focus on core business’ (hopefully a strength).

Kevin does demonstrate characteristics of both the ‘Leader’ and ‘Manager’ persona as this blog defines it around upside and downside. His COO role is central to meeting the business commitments and ensuring the smooth operation of the enterprise (ie. a manager averting downside). But, when we talks about leadership, he focuses very keenly on the upside especially around people. His first principle of his leadership talk was about bringing “people from where they are to where they want to be.” He talked about a question he was asked by a manager and now he asks all of his reports when he first met them, “What are your dreams?”

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