Dilbert - defective brain

 

Adams regularly explores the disconnect between how we see the world and how it really operates. His post “The Monty Hall Problem and Schrodinger’s Cat” illustrates this conundrum well…

  • “This reminds me of the Schrodinger’s Cat thought experiment in which a cat in a sealed box (presumably with air holes) exists in a state of being simultaneously alive and dead depending on the results of a randomized event happening inside the box. How can a cat be alive and dead at the same time? Math says it can happen, my brain says no. The pattern recognition part of my brain is connecting the Monty Hall problem with the Shrodinger’s Cat thought experiment because both situations feel like proof that our brains are not equipped to understand reality at its most basic level. Most of us accept the idea that math is a better indicator of truth than our buggy personal perceptions. Math doesn’t lie, but our brains are huge scam artists. The Monty Hall problem and Schrodinger’s Cat are examples in which our perceptions of reality and the math of reality disagree in a big way. It makes me wonder how much of the rest of my so-called reality disagrees with math without me knowing.”

Adams has even made this characteristic of human nature a central tenet of his semi-apocryphal political platform in this week’s post “The Joiner’s Dilemma”. It actually seems more like a manifesto for a “Skeptic Party” embracing the failure of one’s position at the highest level of government…

  • It turns out that people rationalize whatever their political party supports independent of the facts…My idea is that as President of the United States I would support the majority opinion on every topic with my veto powers and my legislative initiatives while vigorously supporting the argument of the opposite side.
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