I got it wrong about a lot of things. Not just the testicles on my chin.” – Mike Rowe.

Happy Labor Day Americans. Time to take a day off to toast hard work with a beer and hot dog. To celebrate the good…and the bad. The dirty and difficult bits that, really, makes it ‘labor’.

No better expert on the ‘dirty’ side of work than Mike Rowe, star of “Dirty Jobs”. His TED talk “Learning from dirty jobs” examines the best bits about the worst work, and underscores a premise I have written about repeatedly of embracing the failure of dreams

What would happen if we challenged some of these sacred cows? ‘Follow your passion.’ We’ve been talking about it here for the past six hours. ‘Follow your passion.’ What could possibly be wrong with that? It’s probably the worst advice I ever got. You know…follow your dreams and go broke.”

Rowe’s advice echoes similar words of wisdom I got from my university police chief (where I worked as a security guard to pay for school), “There is no perfect job.” There is always some element that is a trade-off. And part of the reason we get paid money to do the job, is because there are a whole bunch of people who don’t want to do it so badly that they will pay to avoid it.

He talks about a millionaire pig farmer. “He didn’t ‘follow his passion’. He looked where everyone was going and he went the other way.”:

“I talk about some of the other things that I got wrong. Some of the other notions of work that I have just been assuming are sacrosanct. And they’re not. People with dirty jobs are happier than you think. As a group, they’re the happiest people I know.”

People confuse “Lottery Ticket Winner” as a viable career choice. Unfortunately, “lottery ticket winner” is dressed up in the guise of legitimate work with job titles like “pop star”, “model” and “professional athlete.”

Rowe elaborates further in this post “A Fan Asks Mike Rowe For Life Advice… His Response Is Truly Brilliant”:

“Stop looking for the “right” career, and start looking for a job. Any job. Forget about what you like. Focus on what’s available. Get yourself hired. Show up early. Stay late. Volunteer for the scut work. Become indispensable. You can always quit later, and be no worse off than you are today. But don’t waste another year looking for a career that doesn’t exist. And most of all, stop worrying about your happiness. Happiness does not come from a job. It comes from knowing what you truly value, and behaving in a way that’s consistent with those beliefs.”

And the delusion of the “dream partner” can pose all the same problems as seeking the “dream job”…

“Claire doesn’t really want a man. She wants the ‘right’ man…She complains about being alone, even though her rules have more or less guaranteed she’ll stay that way. She has built a wall between herself and her goal. A wall made of conditions and expectations.”

Enjoy your beer for tomorrow we work.

Advertisements